Love Did Not Trump Hate (So it’s Time to Smash the State)

Boston Protest
Thousands march in Boston to protest a white supremacist “free speech” rally, on Saturday, Aug. 19, 2017. The tiny group of far-right hatemongers received full police protection and dispersed early.

Following the repugnant, white supremacist carnage in Charlottesville, Virginia, author and Princeton professor, Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor, wrote an article for Jacobin magazine succinctly titled, “No More Charlottesvilles.”

Taylor calls the violence that erupted on Aug. 12, “the predictable outcome of the Republican Party’s racist agenda and Donald Trump’s ascension to the presidency.”

“More than providing a platform for Trump’s racist hate speech,” she writes, “the Republican Party has boosted his political agenda—an agenda that has imbued the racist right with the confidence that they can succeed in their campaign of terrorizing, marginalizing, and even killing those who stand in their way. This includes black and brown people as well as the white antiracists who challenge them. We are all in their crosshairs.”

Our organizing in the wake of Charlottesville—where 32-year-old activist, Heather Heyer, was murdered when a young neo-Nazi drove his car into a crowd of protesters—should be based on solidarity. It should be rooted in the old labor slogan, “An injury to one is an injury to all.”

The dismissive, ultra-left identity-politics which have become endemic among the left in recent years, will not defeat the far right. We absolutely must continue to support the most vulnerable people within our ranks—especially those that have historically been the primary targets of white supremacists’ wrath, like African-Americans, Jews, LGBT folks, and people with disabilities.

But let’s be clear: The fascists are coming for all of us.

Nor will abstract sentiments of “love” and “decency” be sufficient to fight the right. The members of the so-called “alt-right” are not the disadvantaged, ignorant poor the media portray them as. Most of them are middle to upper-middle class, college educated, and voted for Trump precisely because of his quasi-white nationalist leanings. They are not the uneducated, easily swayed victims of “bad ideas.” They understand perfectly well the hate and intolerance they represent.

As one young neo-Nazi candidly told the Washington Post in an online video, “I’m here because our republican values are, number one: standing up for local, white identity. Our identity is under threat [sic]. Number two: the free-market. And number three: killing Jews.”

Don’t get me wrong: I am all for love, and I do not doubt the noble intentions of liberals who advocate we “fight hate with love.” But it will take more than just “love” and good intentions to send the white supremacists packing. It will take organization and a clear, unambiguous political orientation.

The fact is, love did not “trump hate.” So now it’s time to smash the state.

Fortunately, activists on the left seem to be getting the message. People have an intense desire to fight back against the rising far right—especially in the wake of the events in Charlottesville. They want to know how they can contribute to the left-wing resistance. And they are hungry for serious politics to help guide them in this fight.

This desire for real politics over empty, if well-intended, sloganeering was evident at a post-Charlottesville rally in Portland, Maine, the Sunday following the vile “Unite the Right” rally.

Though poorly organized, and hastily thrown together at the last minute, the rally nonetheless drew a crowd of over 400 people. The first few speakers echoed the familiar liberal themes of showing “tolerance” and “understanding” for those we “disagree with”—as if the threat posed by the alt-right is little more than a mere “disagreement.”

Three speakers in, Caitrin Smith, a Portland resident and member of the Portland branch of the International Socialist Organization (ISO) offered a rousing, politically charged speech that not only received raucous applause from the audience, but also served to shift the tone of the remainder of the rally.

“What happened [Aug. 12] is deplorable!” said Smith. “And we are here today to say to these Nazis, ‘Not today!’, ‘Not tomorrow!’, ‘Not ever!'”

She continued:

… The rulers of this country have always relied on oppression and exploitation to drive working people into submission, to maintain their power. Yesterday’s events cannot be examined without an excavation of this history. … We must dismantle the organization of the right with the organization of the left.

Afterwards, a number of people stopped by our ISO “merch booth,” and signed up for our mailing list or bought copies of our monthly newspaper, the Socialist Worker. Our weekly meeting the following Wednesday had about double the typical number of attendees.

A week later, between 15,000-30,000 anti-fascist protesters marched in Boston in opposition to a “free speech” rally held by a tiny group of white supremacists. The Boston march included contingents of ISO branches from Maine, Vermont, Connecticut, New York, and Boston, as well as members of Democratic Socialists of America (DSA), and Socialist Alternative.

There are two competing, highly disparate theories on the left when it comes to confronting these white supremacists.

Liberals and establishment figures in the Democratic Party argue we do nothing at all—just ignore the racist and hope they go away. Protesting, liberals argue, merely grants the far right the attention it seeks. Thus, Boston Mayor Marty Walsh spent the days leading up to the Aug. 19, Boston protest attempting to dissuade activists from taking part in the march.

But ignoring these hate groups does not cause them to go away. Quite the reverse, the lack of a visible opposition to their racist, xenophobic views tends to leave the right further emboldened, allowing their malicious cancer to grow.

On the other hand, far left groups like the Black Bloc and Antifa (short for “anti-fascist”) seek to confront the right in physical confrontations. These confrontations inevitably end in defeat—and arrest—for the leftists. The police have historically acted as the default bodyguards for the KKK and white supremacist groups. This makes for a decidedly unfair fight. Additionally, engaging the right in fist-fights only feeds in to the media narrative that they are “persecuted” by the violent, free-speech-hating liberals.

Neither of these approaches is an effective strategy for fighting the right.

Instead, we should confront them by peacefully, yet forcefully mobilizing in far greater numbers (as we did in Boston) and drowning out their disgusting message with one of our own. Our message must hold up socialism as a viable alternative for dispossessed workers who may find the right’s immigrant and minority scapegoating a convenient narrative for why their own standards of living have declined.

“Now is the time to overcome the fear that the fascists want us to feel,” wrote the editors of Socialist Worker, in an Aug. 15 op-ed following the Charlottesville attack, “and organize demonstrations with overwhelming numbers–to stop this cancer now, before it can grow into something far more threatening. That means organizing broad protests open to everyone affected by this threat–which is just about everyone–to prove the far right is a tiny minority.”

Editor’s note: Red Flag does not support or endorse any WordPress-sponsored advertisements that may appear on readers’ screens. This is another reason why workers, including writers, need to own the means of production–or in this case, the Internet.

If you like this essay feel free to share it widely (Facebook, Twitter, all that stuff…). Adam Marletta can be reached at adamd.marletta@gmail.com.

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The Greatest Obstacle to Single-Payer Health Care: The Democratic Party

California Single Payer Activists
Single-payer advocates march in downtown Los Angeles, March 26, 2017, in support of a bill that would create a national health care system in the state of California.

Regardless of the fate of the Senate’s barbaric health care bill — which, according to the Congressional Budget Office would throw 22 million Americans off of their insurance —the left should seize on the renewed health care debate to push for a universal, single-payer program.

The United States stands alone among wealthy democracies in not treating health care as a basic human right, guaranteed to all citizens. Instead, we have a for-profit, pay-or-die system.

Can’t afford health insurance…? Well, as Democratic Rep. Alan Grayson sardonically put it: “Die quickly.”

But, then, that is capitalism for you. It is a perverse economic system that treats everything — including human lives and the ecosystem that supports all life on the planet — as a commodity.

As famed consumer-advocate and three-time independent presidential candidate, Ralph Nader wrote in an open letter to House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, earlier this year:

“Obamacare, without a public option, has been a complex patchwork in so many ways —including forcing individuals to purchase inadequate insurance from private insurance companies — insurance that carries with it high premiums, deductibles, co-pays and forces narrow networks.”

“For many,” Nader adds, “Obamacare is quasi-catastrophic insurance with limited choice of doctor and hospital.”

Nader goes on to urge Pelosi and the Democrats to push for “single payer Medicare for All — everyone in, nobody out, free choice of doctor and hospital, no medical bankruptcies, no coercive co-pays or deductibles … and no more deaths due to lack of health insurance.”

Sadly, I fear Nader’s exhortation will fall on deaf ears — assuming, that is, Pelosi even reads his letter in the first place.

For one thing, the Democratic Party has regarded Nader as a pariah ever since he “spoiled” the 2000 presidential election for Al Gore — a baseless accusation completely undermined by the fact that Gore won the popular vote and would have won the Electoral College if the Florida re-count had been allowed to take place. It was the right-wing Supreme Court that stole the election from Gore — not Nader.

But, beyond the Democrats’ abject hatred for Nader (as well as more recent Green Party standard-bearer, Jill Stein), the biggest reason the Democrats are unlikely to push for a single-payer bill, now or anytime in the near future, is because they are adamantly opposed to it.

Sure, the prospect of a universal health care program has long been a staple of the Democrats’ campaign rhetoric dating back to President Johnson’s administration. But when push comes to shove, and the Dems are actually in a position to implement single-payer, party leaders suddenly come up with all sorts of excuses why such a national health care program could “never work” here in America, or is “politically impossible” because they simply “don’t have the votes.”

During the Democratic Congress’s crafting of the Affordable Care Act, single-payer was “off the table” from the get-go. In fact, when single-payer activists peacefully interrupted an early White House public hearing on health care, Democratic Sen. Max Baucus (MT) promptly called security and had them arrested. Baucus and his colleagues glibly laughed as the protesters were, one by one, removed from the room.

And the Democrats have only become more forthright in their opposition to single-payer in recent years.

Last year, Pelosi publicly rebuked Sen. Bernie Sanders’ single-payer campaign platform — specifically, his intent to raise taxes on the wealthy in order to fund the program. “We’re not running on any platform of raising taxes,” Pelosi said during a Jan 27, 2016 press conference.

Regarding single-payer, Pelosi added, “It’s no use having a conversation about something that is not going to happen.”

Speaking of Sanders, now would be a prime moment for him to submit his long-promised Medicare-for-all bill in the U.S. Senate. Yet, according to an article by single-payer activist, Dr. Margaret Flowers, Sanders has instead opted to join his Democratic colleagues in fighting to save — and later improve upon — the ACA. Flowers criticizes Sanders for having his “priorities backwards,” accusing him of having “greater allegiance to the Democratic Party than he has to the supporters of Medicare for All, his base.”

But then, the nominally “independent” Vermont senator has always been a de facto member of the Democratic Party, as evidenced by his role as “sheepdog” for Hillary Clinton in the 2016 presidential campaign.

And Democratic legislators in California recently killed a bill that would have implemented a single-payer system in the state. California Assembly Speaker Anthony Rendon announced June 23 he was putting the bill, SB 562, on “hold,” effectively leaving it stranded in legislative limbo. The bill passed the State Senate, 23-14, earlier this month.

All of this is further evidence that the Democratic Party is perhaps the greatest obstacle to achieving universal health care, nationally or even at the state level. As the Bay Area chapter of Socialist Alternative writes of the Dems’ betrayal on SB 562, on their website:

California Senator Diane Feinstein, House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi and Governor Jerry Brown are united. They want to kill off the whole idea of single-payer. … Once again they [the Democrats] aim for a corporate-friendly “centrist” policy when the left is the popular place to be. Despite the progress that Obamacare represents, it and Trumpcare are both market-based plans that do not challenge the big health insurance companies’ parasitic role in health care.

Little wonder then, that Kevin Phillips, a former strategist for Richard Nixon, once referred to the Democrats as “history’s second most enthusiastic capitalist party.”

Pelosi seemed to concede as much during a CNN town hall-style debate, earlier this year. When a young man in the audience asked Pelosi about the Democrats’ failure to move further to the left on economic issues in accordance with a growing majority of young people, Pelosi responded, “Well, I thank you for your question. But I have to say, we’re capitalist and that’s just the way it is.”

Well, there you have it. Straight from the donkey’s mouth.

But despite the Democrats’ professed anxieties about the “difficulty” of funding a single-payer system (*cough* Tax the rich! *cough*), it is really not complicated at all. Currently, our pay-or-die health care system wastes $375 billion a year on health insurance paperwork alone — most of which is billing-related. This accounts for roughly 15 percent of overall national health care spending.

And while single-payer has always had broad popular support among Americans, that support is currently at its highest level in decades. A recent Pew Research Center survey finds 60 percent of Americans support “a single-payer approach to health insurance.” Likewise, a majority of respondents believe it is the “federal government’s responsibility to make sure all Americans have health care coverage.”

The Republicans’ stalled efforts to “repeal and replace” Obamacare have, understandably, put leftists in a difficult position. They are scrambling to defend a health care reform that, while certainly better than any barbaric, “free-market” alternative the GOP has in mind, is still significantly flawed.

Thus, there has never been a better time to push for single-payer. The left’s job should not be to defend the “lesser evil” of an untenable status quo. Rather, we should be unafraid to offer bold, radical alternatives to our racist, sexist, xenophobic capitalist society. This includes an unapologetic recognition that abortion is a form of health care which all women should have free and unhindered access to without shame or stigma.

Sadly, Planned Parenthood and the Democratic Party will not make these demands for us. Only the working class can bring about its own emancipation. This is yet another reason why the working class needs its own revolutionary political party.

As Democracy Now! host, Amy Goodman, and Dennis Moynihan observe in a recent column titled, “Medicare for All: A Prescription for What Ails Us”:

“Single-payer is already in practice in the U.S. and is immensely popular. It’s called Medicare, the tax-payer funded program that guarantees health care for seniors and people with permanent disabilities.”

They continue:

… Currently, 57 million seniors and people with disabilities are on Medicare, out of a U.S. population of 320 million. There is no rational reason why Medicare couldn’t be expanded to cover all Americans, regardless of age, from birth to death. … The savings [from a Medicare for All system] would be extraordinary, and the system would most likely be as popular as Medicare is today.

Editor’s note: Red Flag does not support or endorse any WordPress-sponsored advertisements that may appear on readers’ screens. This is another reason why workers, including writers, need to own the means of production–or in this case, the Internet.

If you like this essay feel free to share it widely (Facebook, Twitter, all that stuff…). Adam Marletta can be reached at adamd.marletta@gmail.com.

Thanks for reading!